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Three Cheers for Your Ears, Nose, and Throat


Monday, February 3rd, 2014

Winter is the season for sniffles, scratchy throats, and earaches — often all at once!

And with good reason: our ears, nose, and throat all are connected and affect each other greatly. Otolaryngologists (also known as ear, nose, and throat doctors or ENTs) are physicians who specialize in caring for this complex, interrelated system.

Test Your Ear, Nose, and Throat Knowledge with this Quick Quiz

Who gets earaches more often — children or adults?

Nearly every child experiences at least one ear infection between infancy and the age of five — something weary parents know firsthand. Because children have shorter, straighter Eustachian tubes (which connect the nose to the ears), it’s easier for bacteria to migrate into their ears.

Why are you more likely to get a nosebleed in winter?

The same heated indoor air that makes your home cozy in winter also can dehydrate the inside of your nose. It can become crusted or cracked, or can even bleed. A dry nose makes you more susceptible to germs, so exercise good nose care. Lightly coat the inside with petroleum jelly. Over-the-counter saline mists and sprays (not decongestants) also are helpful.

Will antibiotics cure laryngitis?

Most cases of laryngitis are caused by viral infections that make the vocal cords swell — so antibiotics are ineffective. Your best course of action? Drink plenty of fluids, rest, and cut back on talking. Straining your voice when you have acute laryngitis can damage your vocal cords.

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Ear Nose and Throat

UPMC is ranked among the nation’s best for ear, nose, and throat care by U.S. News & World Report. From the simplest ear, nose, and throat conditions to the most complex, our renowned experts are dedicated to providing the highest quality care for you and your family. Read More