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Vaccines for College: What to Know Before You Go


WRITTEN BY: Pediatrics
Saturday, September 10th, 2016

If you or a loved one are headed off to college for the first time, there’s probably a lot on your mind: Buying textbooks, furnishing a dorm room, and adjusting to new courses, to name a few.

But before you begin this new chapter, it’s important to protect yourself and those around you by getting your required college vaccinations. These vaccines are critical in the prevention of disease — particularly if you’ll be living in close quarters with others.

Remember, you should always make an appointment with your doctor before starting college. Contact Children’s Community Pediatrics today for more information. You should also check in with your college to learn more about vaccines for college.

Know Before You Go: Vaccines for College

1. Meningococcal Conjugate Booster

First-year college students and students who live on campus are most at risk for the disease that causes meningitis, a deadly inflammation of the tissue surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Living in close proximity to others promotes the spread of the disease.

Many students are required to receive at least one dose of the meningococcal vaccine before attending college, though in some cases a second dose may be required. Students should talk to their health care provider to learn more about their required vaccines.

 

2. Human Papilloma Virus

The HPV vaccine is typically offered to children age 11 or 12. But if your college student has not yet received these three-shot vaccine series, the beginning of college presents a good opportunity.

The HPV shot prevents four strains of a virus that causes genital warts and cervical cancer. The series is administered over a period of nine months.

flu shot

3. Seasonal Flu Shot

The flu is one of the most deadly diseases, responsible for thousands of deaths each year, as well as days of missed work and hospitalizations. Because the flu season is active from October to May, exactly the time that most universities are in session, a flu shot can be an important way to protect your student from a severe case of the flu.

Each flu season is different, so it’s essential to get a new flu shot each year to be updated on the flu virus that is going around that season.

RELATED: Know Your Flu Shot Facts

4. TDAP (Tetanus, Diphtheria, Acellular Pertussis)

This vaccine protects against three highly serious conditions. Fortunately, vaccines have made diphtheria uncommon in the United States, while tetanus is caused by puncture wounds from environmental sources.

Pertussis, or whooping cough, however, is a severe cough that can last months or weeks. This serious ailment can cause fractured ribs, fainting, and pneumonia. For young children and infants, whooping cough can be fatal.

Many doctors recommend a booster of the TDAP vaccine before heading off to college.

5. Vaccines for Traveling

If your student plans on traveling abroad, he or she should consider several vaccines.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website can help you choose the right vaccine or the country or part of the world you’re visiting, how long you’ll be staying, as well as the underlying medical conditions you may have.

Pediatrics

Pediatrics

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC has helped establish the standards of excellence in pediatric care. Renowned for its outstanding clinical services, research programs, and medical education, Children’s Hospital was designed with input from physicians, nurses, and families, to ensure that patients receive quality, family-centered care in a comfortable setting. Read More