Sick

You’ve started coughing, you have a fever, and you feel tired all the time. You think you probably have some kind of respiratory illness — but is it the flu or COVID-19?

Many symptoms overlap between the flu and COVID-19, such as fever, cough, and tiredness. Unfortunately, it’s not possible for anyone, including a doctor, to tell the difference from symptoms alone.

But you can help your health care providers to help you — and help them tell if you need a COVID-19 test. Pay attention to your symptoms, including when they start, so your doctor can use that information to determine what you need to do.

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Flu Symptoms vs. Coronavirus Symptoms

It’s possible to have very mild or very severe symptoms with either the flu or COVID-19, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The following symptoms are especially common with flu and COVID-19.

  • Fever
  • Dry cough
  • Tiredness

Other symptoms can occur with either flu or coronavirus. They vary in how common they are for different people:

  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Vomiting or feeling sick to your stomach
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Suddenly losing your sense of smell or taste (This appears to happen more often with COVID-19 but happens with other diseases too.)
  • Respiratory problems
  • Body aches or muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Lack of hunger
  • Body chills

Risk of Death from COVID-19 and the Flu

About one in every 1,000 people who have flu dies from the disease. The risk of dying from COVID-19 is several times greater than the risk of dying from the flu, according to the CDC. Scientists are still learning how much deadlier COVID-19 is, and the risk of death can vary greatly based on personal characteristics.

These people have a higher risk of dying from COVID-19 or the flu:

  • Older adults
  • People with other medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, heart problems, diabetes, obesity, and other issues.

The risk of dying from COVID-19 is very different depending on your age. The older someone is, the higher their risk of death from COVID-19, especially over age 50. The likelihood of dying from COVID-19 is much lower among younger people.

It is possible to have COVID-19 and the flu at the same time. Scientists don’t yet know how often this occurs or what the risks of having both diseases is.

How Long the Flu and COVID-19 Last

Another difference between the flu and COVID-19 is how long people are sick with the disease. Unvaccinated people with the flu are usually sick for at least a week or two. They may be sick for longer if they develop complications or need to be admitted to the hospital.

How long someone can be sick with COVID-19 varies a lot more. Some people have no symptoms or very mild symptoms; they should focus mostly on not spreading the disease to others. Other people can be sick for two to six weeks or become so sick that they need hospitalization.

 

Do I have the flu or COVID-19?

What to Do If You Think You Have the Flu or COVID-19

If you think you might have COVID-19, you should call your primary care doctor and tell them your symptoms. They will tell you whether to get a COVID-19 test and to isolate at home.

Your doctor may or may not recommend a flu test. Your provider also might or might not recommended an anti-viral medication to treat the flu. The best way to treat the flu at home is to rest and drink plenty of water and other clear fluids.

These are the most important steps to take if you think you might have COVID-19:

  • Stay at home from work or school
  • Avoid going out in public. If you have to, wear a mask.
  • Call your primary care doctor
  • Get tested for COVID-19
  • Pay attention to symptoms that require you to go to the hospital

If you experience any of the emergency warning signs below, you should go to the hospital:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Pain or pressure in your chest or stomach that won’t stop
  • Dizziness or confusion that won’t go away
  • Seizures
  • Not being able to pee
  • Severe pain in your muscles
  • Feeling extremely weak or unable to balance
  • A cough or fever that first gets better and then come back or gets worse
  • If symptoms of another condition you already have get worse

Concerned about your symptoms? Visit UPMC.com/COVID19 to use our COVID-19 symptom checker tool.

Sources

Aaron Kandola. New coronavirus vs. flu, Medical News Today. March 19, 2020. Link

Carol H. Yan, Farhoud Faraji, Divya P. Prajapati, et al. Association of chemosensory dysfunction and COVID‐19 in patients presenting with influenza‐like symptoms. International Forum of Allergy and Rhinology. April 12, 2020. Link

Caring for Someone Sick, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Link

Clinical Questions about COVID-19: Questions and Answers, Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Link

COVID-19 Hospitalization and Death by Age, Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Link

Flu: What To Do If You Get Sick, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Link

Frequently Asked Questions About Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19), National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. Link

Frequently Asked Questions, Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Link

Mortality Analyses, Coronavirus Resource Center, Johns Hopkins University and Medicine. Link

Robert Pellegrino, Keiland W Cooper, Antonella Di Pizio, et al. Coronaviruses and the Chemical Senses: Past, Present, and Future. Chemical Senses. May 14, 2020. Link

Robert Roy Britt. From Infection to Recovery: How Long It Lasts, Elemental. April 13, 2020. Link

Similarities and Differences between Flu and COVID-19, Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Link

About UPMC

A $21 billion health care provider and insurer, Pittsburgh-based UPMC is inventing new models of patient-centered, cost-effective, accountable care. The largest nongovernmental employer in Pennsylvania, UPMC integrates more than 90,000 employees, 40 hospitals, 700 doctors’ offices and outpatient sites, and a 3.8 million-member Insurance Services Division, the largest medical insurer in western Pennsylvania. In the most recent fiscal year, UPMC contributed $1.4 billion in benefits to its communities, including more care to the region’s most vulnerable citizens than any other health care institution, and paid more than $500 million in federal, state, and local taxes. Working in close collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences, UPMC shares its clinical, managerial, and technological skills worldwide through its innovation and commercialization arm, UPMC Enterprises, and through UPMC International. U.S. News & World Report consistently ranks UPMC Presbyterian Shadyside on its annual Honor Roll of America’s Best Hospitals and ranks UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh on its Honor Roll of America’s Best Children’s Hospitals. For more information, go to UPMC.com.