The Importance of Hydration for Your Heart

Whether you’re vacationing on a tropical island or just hanging out in your backyard, chances are you are spending a lot of time outside this summer. Whether you’re enjoying reading a good book in your background with the sun beating down on you, or playing a rough-and-tumble game of summer touch football, it’s easy to work up a sweat and lose water as you soak up those rays.

To beat the summer heat, you must keep your body hydrated. Proper hydration is not only good for your brain, your mood, and your body weight, but it’s also essential for your heart.

Your heart is constantly working, pumping about 2,000 gallons of blood a day. By staying hydrated – i.e. drinking more water than you are losing – you are helping your heart do its job. A hydrated heart is able to pump blood more easily, allowing the muscles in your body to work even better.

RELATED: Hydration 101: What You Need to Know

Dehydration causes strain on your heart. The amount of blood circulating through your body, or blood volume, decreases when you are dehydrated. To compensate, your heart beats faster, increasing your heart rate and causing you to feel palpitations. Also your blood retains more sodium, making it tougher for it to circulate through your body.

So how much water should you drink to stay hydrated? It really depends on how much your body needs. Some situations where you should drink more water include:

  • If you are exercising or doing other physical activities.
  • If you have certain medical conditions, such as diabetes or heart disease.
  • If you are showing signs of dehydration, such as dizziness or weakness.

Please also keep in mind that certain medical conditions (such as heart failure) may require varying hydration strategies and consult with your physician as required.

Sources:

Staying Hydrated — Staying Healthy: American Heart Association

The Effects of Dehydration on the Cardiovascular System: LIVESTRONG.com